Point of Contact – A Gripping Collection of Cycling Gloves

Pedals, saddle and handlebars. These are our mechanical points of contact with the bicycle, anywhere else we meet is accidental and likely to be painful. We clip in with special shoes, pad our seats with chamois and when we reach for the hoods, invariably we're wearing gloves. Owing to an irrational fear of sanding my knuckles on pavement, my personal preference is for full-fingered gloves year round, even though that might not fly in the PRO peloton. I prefer the extra coverage and don't ever find them too hot, but to each his own. I've got two pairs of the best stubbies leading off for the classicists.

Fashion note: cycling gloves are categorized as accessories, though we'd all agree they're essential. In the truest fashion sense of accessorizing, adding one or two pairs from the following collection of gloves will give you a comfortable grip and coordinate with the rest of your kit. They might even make your hand gestures more visible. There's no significance to the numbering... every one of these gloves is a winner in my books.

Rapha Criterium Gloves

Rapha Criterium Glove

Putting aside the obvious fact these gloves cost two body parts (an arm and a leg) to pamper your hands, Rapha's sniper-padded, open-knuckled Criterium gloves are the epitome of style. The fit gets better with age and with a careful hand wash every now and then I expect to get several seasons out of these beauties. Having seen the Continental boys give them a thrashing I know they can take it, but I'm reserving mine for special long rides and Sportives, when I need every boost a little extra style can provide.

The back of the thumb is covered in soft suede. No matter how much you're hurting you might think twice about using it to wipe your nose. I will.

TypeHalf-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$130 Rapha / $125 Competitive Cyclist
Material(s)Tanned Kid Leather, Alcantara® thumb-wipe
CompressionThe natural stretch of leather
Internal SeamsSoft, nicely finished, good between fingers
ClosureVelcro tab
Nose WipeabilityYes, but resist!
Fit and FinishSuperb
Applications/SeasonsRoad Cycling, Watching Top Gear
Additional ColorsNone
Rapha Grand Tour Gloves

Rapha Grand Tour Glove

Take the Rapha Criterium glove, upgrade the leather, perforate the back, ring and reinforce the knuckle cut outs and present it in pristine white and you have what arguably is the ultimate cycling glove. Certainly these say PRO even if our legs and bike handling do not. Rapha doesn’t stipulate any bar tape restrictions but these should come with a box of white tape and a white-tape-or-else warranty.

As you can see I've only got two hands and about two or three years worth of gloves to wear out. Somewhere along the line I'll find the right time to christen the Grand Tours, but it's going to have to be a very special occasion. Maybe I'll break them in gently, say watching a stage or two of this year's Tour wearing them, some pleasures you just don't want to rush.

TypeHalf-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$160 Rapha / $160 Competitive Cyclist
Material(s)African Hair Sheep Leather
CompressionThe natural stretch of leather
Internal SeamsSoft, nicely finished, good between fingers
ClosureVelcro tab
Nose WipeabilityNever
Fit and FinishPerfection
Applications/SeasonsRoad Cycling, Commuting to the Pearly Gates
Additional ColorsNone
Specialized BG Gel Glove

Specialized BG Gel Glove

The long-fingered Gels are my favorite summer glove. I have three pairs of 07/08 Gels that have seen thousands of miles of riding, multiple washings and still feel good and perform well. There's definitely real science behind the BG (Body Geometry) designation that Specialized puts on its gear. Everything I’ve worn with the BG label (gloves and shoes) has been exceptionally comfortable and ergonomically sound. The 2009 Gel has beefier padding in the heel of the palm/base of the fingers, grippy polyurethane dots on the thumb, fore- and index- fingers and the full thumb wipe is soft enough to safely clean your fancy sunglasses (BR, those $6 safety glasses too).

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$40 Specialized
Material(s)Micromatrix synthetic leather palm, stretch mesh back
CompressionEntire Glove has a solid compressive stretch
Internal SeamsExceptional, as soft inside as a glove can be
ClosureVelcro tab
Nose WipeabilitySoft, microwipe thumb
Fit and FinishOutstanding
Applications/SeasonsSpring, Summer, Fall, gel padding ideal for centuries
Additional ColorsSilver/Blue, White/Black
Specialized BG Ridge

Specialized BG Ridge Glove

Here's another nice glove from Specialized. In terms of overall feel this glove reminds me of the 07/08 Gel with an identical gel pad in the heel of the palm to protect the sensitive ulnar nerve (the one that turns our hands into numb meat hooks after hours in the saddle). Open mesh surfaces between the fingers add cooling for hot days and without being too tight, there's a nice stretch compression to the fit. The Ridge is my new go-to commuting glove.

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$35 Specialized
Material(s)Micromatrix synthetic leather palm, stretch mesh (nylon/spandex)back
CompressionEntire Glove has a solid compressive stretch
Internal SeamsVery Good, one seam on back of thumb where microwipe ends registers but no discomfort
ClosureVelcro tab
Nose WipeabilitySoft, microwipe thumb
Fit and FinishOutstanding
Applications/SeasonsSpring, Summer, Fall, gel padding ideal for centuries
Additional ColorsBrown, Navy
Knog Ride Hard

Knog Ride Hard Glove

Meant to be ridden hard and put away wet is the short story on these lookers from Knog. They'll be sharing "Red" duty with a pair of Oakleys every time I wear a Rapha red jersey or pull on my red Lightweight Softshell Jacket. Cut from a slightly heavier goatskin leather with double stitching at all the strategic wear points and flash red suede inserts on the palms/crook of the thumb, these gloves from the boys in Melbourne rock. I've been wearing two pairs (black and white/olive) for a year and other than a little dirt on the white ones, they're still going strong. I've not washed either pair yet... but every few rides I rub in a little leather conditioner we've got sitting in the garage for the car. Works well.

If you sweat a lot, you'll probably have to give them a rinse more often. Just wash them on your hands, making sure if you use hand soap to really rinse them well (any soap residue will dry the leather and stiffen them). Hang them to dry away from any direct sunlight. While they are still damp put them on and stretch the glove back into shape on your hand. Again a little leather conditioner at this stage won't hurt.

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$59 Smartbikeparts.com
Material(s)Goatskin Leather
CompressionGloves will stretch to size, don't buy too large
Internal SeamsGood, soft, since each hide is different varies a little glove to glove
ClosureVelcro tab
Nose WipeabilityDo what you gotta do
Fit and FinishA nicely sewn leather glove
Applications/SeasonsWarm weather, commuting, styling
Additional ColorsWhite/Olive, Black
Knog Eight Ball

Knog Eight Ball Glove

Another urban variation from Knog. The Eight Ball is basic black with white piping around the fingers and "8-ball" logo on the back of each hand. Suede inserts on the palm and perforated suede on the back of the thumb pad your grip on the bars and provide a soft wipe when you need to keep sweat out your eyes. Rapha Black Long Sleeve Jersey compatible.

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchaseapprox $60 USD (contact Woodie at Knog's store)
Material(s)Goatskin Leather
CompressionGloves will stretch to size, don't buy too large
Internal SeamsGood, soft, since each hide is different varies a little glove to glove
ClosureVelcro tab (softer loop side is on glove itself, which makes more sense to me than norm)
Nose WipeabilityPerforated Suede is soft
Fit and FinishA nicely sewn leather glove
Applications/SeasonsWarm weather, commuting, running tables
Additional ColorsNone, available as a short-finger though
Knog Fuck Off

Knog Fuck Off Glove

What a beautiful sentiment with almost universal appeal. Only Knog would have the stones and sense of humor to name a pair of gloves Fuck Off. Like the Ride Hards and Eight Balls these are cut from fine-grained goatskin. A suede inset on the palm adds padding and durability. The back of the thumb is white suede. I'd love to have been there when the design spec for these gloves reached the factory in China. There had to have been some cross-cultural head scratching.

Personally I was hoping for a very bold graphic presentation of the moniker; along the lines of Everlast boxing gloves, but Knog's treatment of the expletive is a restrained bit of heraldic fun. Pity, I fancied flashing my FO gloves at the next motorist who did something incredibly stupid.

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchaseapprox $60 USD (contact Woodie at Knog's store)
Material(s)Goatskin Leather
CompressionGloves will stretch to size, don't buy too large
Internal SeamsGood, soft, since each hide is different varies a little glove to glove
ClosureVelcro tab (softer loop side is on glove itself, which makes more sense to me than norm)
Nose WipeabilityPerforated Suede is soft
Fit and FinishA nicely sewn leather glove
Applications/SeasonsWarm weather, commuting, sending a subtle message
Additional ColorsNone, available as a short-finger though
Craft Power WS Gloves

Craft Power Wind Stopper Glove

I couldn't resist picking up this glove when Competitive Cyclist offered it at 50% off the in-season price. The glove looks great and fits me perfectly through the fingers, but getting it on is a real struggle. The neoprene cuff on this glove makes a velcro closure unnecessary (it might qualify as a NASA airlock). In fact I won't know till the fall and the first ride whether the compression is too much and it actually cuts off circulation. Hopefully a few rides will loosen the neoprene a touch and I'll have a fine pair fall gloves to keep the wind at bay.

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$35 winter clearance (may be discontinued)
Material(s)ProAero fabric, Clarino synthetic palm and neoprene cuff
CompressionHigh compression
Internal SeamsI can't feel anything because the cuff is so snug
ClosureNo closure, neoprene cuff
Nose WipeabilityThumb and forefinger are soft synthetics
Fit and FinishVery snug, may be tough to put on big wrists
Applications/SeasonsCool Weather
Additional ColorsNone

A Handful of Good Alternatives to Consider

In my search for good mitts I'm prepared to think outside the box. Here then are a few more gloves, and bargains that feel great on the bike, even if the label doesn't explicitly mention cycling.

Oakley Factory Pilot Gloves

Oakley Factory Pilot Glove

Oakley sunglasses are no stranger to the PRO peloton. Lance and George are just the first two names that come to mind wearing them. Turns out the company has a terrific lineup of gloves, starting with the Factory Pilot MTB glove I discovered last Fall. The Pilot is a great fitting, super comfortable synthetic with a nice compressive fit. Two bands of neoprene at the wrist and across the back of the hand eliminate the need for a separate closure. Unlike the Craft WS, the Oakley Factory Pilot is easy to slip on and doesn't overdo the compression.

The Pilot looks great with the Rapha Lighweight Softshell Jacket and anything else red. At $20 you're not going to find a better deal in a three season, full-fingered glove. Superb.

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$20 Oakley.com
Material(s)Clarino palm, terry nose wipe on thumb, neoprene
CompressionPerfect compression
Internal SeamsPerfect, you can't feel them
ClosureNo closure, neoprene cuff
Nose WipeabilityTerry thumb is easy on the nose
Fit and FinishExcellent
Applications/SeasonsSpring, Summer, Fall
Additional ColorsBlack, Sheet Metal
Oakley Golf Glove 3.0

Oakley Golf Glove 3.0

I digress... having played golf with a single-digit handicap for more than 30 years, I've gone through a fortune in golf gloves. Early on I developed the unusual habit of wearing two gloves on my left hand. This started because I loved the feel of premium leather but couldn't afford to buy a new one every two weeks (ten rounds or so, I played a lot in those days). I figured out I could wear the leather glove inside a cheaper synthetic, so the outer glove took the wear and tear and the leather glove lasted twice as long. I got used to the thicker padding and feel of two gloves. When I started working and could afford a real two glove habit, it was cabretta leather inside and out. It never fails to surprise playing partners when they eventually notice I'm removing two gloves to putt.

Gripping a handlebar isn't that different from gripping a driver, but golf gloves don't come in pairs so you have to order left and right individually. Oakley's golf gloves offer the unmatched feel of premium cabretta leather. The fingers are pre-curved and vented, the thumb inset and vented. If you run gel under your bar tape, you'll have the best of both worlds (feel and padded comfort) with these gloves.

Lightweight and cool, I wear the Oakleys when the temp gets up into the upper 80s and beyond. It's nice to know if you happen to ride by a driving range you have the option to roll onto the practice tee and hit a large bucket.

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$40 Oakley.com (L $20, R $20)
Material(s)Cabretta Leather
CompressionPerfect
Internal SeamsPerfect
ClosureBroad Velcro Tab
Nose WipeabilityNone
Fit and FinishExcellent
Applications/SeasonsWarm Weather, short rides
Additional ColorsBlack
Under Armour Golf Glove

Under Armour Golf Glove

Fifteen dollars for a premium leather glove is an incrediable value. My latest check on the Under Armour site, reveals a shortage of right hand sizes, so it may not be possible to assemble a pair at the moment. The sewn-in elastic at the wrist is narrower than the Oakley's so it's not quite as seamless. That one small deficiency is easily forgiven because this is an exceptional fitting glove; perfect finger length, synthetic heatgear webbing between fingers and a beautiful stretch mesh where the thumb is inset into the palm (I've not seen this on any other glove) round out another great glove worth riding in.

TypeFull-fingered
Size TestedMedium
Purchase$30 underarmour.com (L $15, R $15)
Material(s)Cabretta Leather
Compression
Internal SeamsGood
ClosureBroad Velcro Tab
Nose WipeabilityNone
Fit and FinishExcellent
Applications/SeasonsWarm Weather, short rides, velo dressage
Additional ColorsBlack

That about does it then. Apologies to the short-finger faithful for concentrating on the full fingers so much... I have touched on two of the best stubbies from Rapha if the price doesn't put them out of consideration and you're prepared to show them a little TLC between rides. At the other end of the price spectrum the Specialized Ridge and Oakley Factory Pilot gloves offer great fit, easy care and exceptional value. Between those two poles, the three offerings from Knog are stylish and sewn to last and there's the unmatched feel of repurposed cabretta golf gloves (Oakley and Under Armour) if you can live without padding. If that's not enough for you, go to Knog get the FO. Over and out.

                                                   

38 Responses to Point of Contact – A Gripping Collection of Cycling Gloves

  1. Synergy says:

    Nice to see a mitt/glove shoot out.I swear by my Assos mitts.No velcro fastening straps,just simple pull on design.Close to perfection in terms of form and function.
    High on the design quotient has to be snot-rocket-residue wiping capabilities,surely.The Rapha jobs fail miserably here.Is there a Team Issue mitt due shortly? If the wipe factor is good on those then I’ll certainly be adding a pair to my next order.

  2. Should have had something from Assos to test but the lineup was getting a bit unwieldy as it was. Next time.

    I vaguely recall something being mentioned about a Rapha team glove; I’ll check.

  3. Glovely says:

    Can you please share for me your experience with leather gloves, knog in particular, regarding size, stretch and what is the best approach. Some have advised me, knog included, to buy the size you can barely get on and they will stretch to fit like skin. if you buy a size that fits out of the box they will end up too big one worn in??

    • Clinton,
      Woodie at the Knog store in Melbourne gave me the same advice, and its sound. The gloves will certainly soften up after a few days wearing them and stretch maybe 5-10% in girth. I haven’t found the fingers really stretch lengthwise so that fit is probably going to be the limiting factor. With full-fingered gloves you don’t want the tips of your fingers jammed into the ends.

      As I mentioned the hides vary from glove to glove a bit, and Woodie and I talked about how different color dyes can affect the characteristics of the leather. When my original two pairs of Ride Hards arrived the White/Olive ones were noticeably softer than the black ones. I spent the first week wearing and stretching the black ones while watching TV in the evening. The White/Olive pair was basically a good fit right away. Within a couple of weeks the black ones fit like a second skin. Now a year later, the black leather is actually softer than the White/Olive and fits perfectly. The White/Olive feel good but could be a bit tighter.

      If you’re on the edge between sizes go with the smaller size. Of the three models of glove I found a slight diff in cut (very small). The Ride Hards are the tightest, followed by the FOs and then the Eight Balls. Hope that helps.

  4. Kurt says:

    It appears you have a glove fetish Velo!
    The eight balls from Knog look very nice, I like the piping.

    What I am missing from your photos is the other side of the story. The pad design. I just (like 30 minutes ago) picked up a pare of Giro Lusso with a unique pad design that runs along the side of the palm and inside the thumb and fore finger. It appears perfect for hangin out on the hoods for those 3-4 hour days. I am looking for answers to reduce the meat hook numbness you so aptly described. I am hoping this is it.

    In taking the advise of the rapha web-site I went a half size small on the criterium glove. I could not get them past the second knuckle. Replacements are on the way and I am anxious to see how they look and perform. Albeit, the padding is thinner than any glove I have seen.

    Side note: The photos on your last postings were remarkable and in my personal opinion rival some of the bicycle magazines I was perusing this weekend. Love the layer cake photo.

    • Kurt if you click through the galleries for each glove you’ll see an “inside” shot showing the padding on the palms.

      The Rapha Crits and GTs are very snug around the fingers initially, sounds like you really did need a larger size though.

      thanks for the kind words on the Hamilton shoot, the layer cake took a while to materialize… I wasn’t sure it would actually happen.

  5. steve says:

    i’ve a pair of the rapha grand tour gloves and they in no way look like those pictured. have you used the ones shown? if so, how do you clean them? mine are a bit stiff and kinda gray. admittedly, i’ve not used a wool wash like kookabura, can’t find that locally. i rinse them in water with mild soap and lay flat to dry. any secrets you use. thanks and i enjoy your site.

    • Don’t feel bad Steve, that pair was brand new for photography. There’s no way, even if we changed white bar tape after every ride they can stay looking like that for long.

      I included my leather care routine in the Knog Ride Hard section. Sounds like you’re doing all the right things. Try a little leather cream or good hand moisturizer (just make sure the products are white and try them on a small area first).

  6. willy in pacifica says:

    I just got a pair of the Crit gloves in medium but I usually wear a large. I wore them around the house in the evening and they are now a perfect fit. Thinking a large right out of the box would work also I bought a pair of Rapha large gloves but they are way too big. They were an older style I belive and they have a snap instead of velcro. But they are purple!!!

    I wore the Crit golves this past weekend on the first 155 miles of a 375 miler. They worked fine but when it started to turn dark I put on the Specialized medium weight long fingerd gloves and left the crit gloves in a drop bag. I figured by the time it warmed up Sunday I could just go barehanded for the last 100 miles or so. Worked out fine but wished I had the gloves.

    There is not much padding in them so I would not recommend them for any rides lasting longer than one day : )

    willy in pacifica

    • Willy,

      I love your last throwaway line… “I would not recommend them for any rides lasting longer than a day.” I feel the same way about my legs ;-)

      • Kurt says:

        Yes,
        That last line gave me a nice chuckle and spoken like a true Randonneur. Back tracking to your gallery of pcitures when you and Willy 1st met, I noticed Willy’s hands were gloveless.
        True Grit!

  7. BR says:

    Can I get the F-O’s in chrome?

  8. Art says:

    Leather gloves? $150 ones at that! Good hell, do you guys actually even ride? Nice pics though.

  9. BR says:

    Define “ride”

  10. BR says:

    Let’s see…I am 100 a week +/- 20, Michael is, correct me if I am wrong, ~ 200 wk, Willy? 400+/wk? Tim C? guessing 150-200 wk? All of these miles are covered in the finest threads and on the coolest bikes! Others chime in? Just curious and this isn’t a “who has the biggest _______ in the room” discussion.

  11. Art says:

    I don’t actually ride either, I walk my Pista with orange rims to the coffee shop. I buy my gloves at Hot Topic, they have spikes! As soon as I sell a few dozen more of my etchings I will be able to buy a Rapha hat to replace the Cinelli one I lost at the last Fall Out Boy show

    • Art,

      The regulars who frequent Velodramatic are happy to needle each other a bit, but don’t assume anyone here is less committed to riding than you are. I hope you’re not doing that, because it’s totally legit for you to question spending $160 on gloves. And for that very reason there were great gloves in the review for $20. Everyone decides for themselves how they’ll spend their hard end money.

      Happy to have you here, but if you’re looking to stir things up, you’ve come to the wrong place (that’s what roadbikereview forums are for). In the grand scheme of things we’re all hacks on the bike whether we ride 25, 100 or 200 miles a week. Truly talented riders are a) not going to be worried about how much we’re riding and b) would be magnanimous about any positive effort to get out and ride.

      I’m sure your bike doesn’t have orange rims, but I could see orange rims going rather nicely with the Rapha Cross bibs and jersey before they got covered in mud.

  12. christopher says:

    The grand tour glove is by far the best!

  13. Scott says:

    Thought I would give some first hand experience regarding Rapha gloves.

    I loved my GT’s for the first 4 months, and then the colour goes, the softness of the leather disappears and I got identical holes in my L and R hand where my middle finger meets my pointing finger. I still love the look, but the multiple seasons of wear I was expecting from them just didn’t eventuate. I wasn’t using these extensively either 2-3 times per week, rotating them with the criterium glove (depending on what I was wearing of course). A year on and I can’t wear them to ride in. This is the first bit of kit out of Rapha which has disappointed.

    However, the Criterium glove is awesome. It doesn’t have the style points of the GT, but at least it has the longevity!

    Scott

    • Good feedback Scott. Leather gloves and white ones in particular have a limited lifespan. The GTs are my first pair of white cycling gloves but as I mentioned I’ve used and abused hundreds of white leather golf gloves over the years. There’s nothing softer or better feeling when they are new. The super thin leather of a premium golf glove can be washed gently two times before its completely lost its softness, and long before that point its light gray and no longer white. Serious golfers get used to the new glove difference and accept pulling another one from the bag every 5 or 6 rounds as stoically as they reach for another $4 golf ball on that long par three over water ;-) This actually makes for an interesting comparison.

      A premium golf glove like the FJ StaSof is around $20. If you get 5 rounds out of one and let’s hope you play relatively quickly (4hrs), that’s 20 hrs/$20 for a cost of $1 per hour. If you wore golf gloves on both hands that would work out to $2 per hour.

      Now here’s my math on the GTs. I would be happy if I got 20 x 4 hour rides out of these gloves. That’s 80 hours total/$160 or $2 per hour. Bear in mind the last ten rides the gloves won’t be as nice as the first ten; a little soiled or gray, a little stiff to start out till the heat and moisture of your hands relaxes them.

      So there you have it. The cost of wearing white premium leather gloves for any sport is $2 per hour.

  14. Kurt says:

    Just received the exchange on the crit gloves. The medium was tight yet fit the description of fitting. I picked them up from the lobby guy just before work and could not help but wear them while I raced to work in the TT. They look and feel incredible, can’t wait to test drive them on the 75 mile group ride on Saturday.

    I purchased these beauties because they fit with my personal philospohy, “anything worth doing is worth doing in style”. And these gloves from Rapha and the Jerseys work with my personal style sense. $160 pails in comparison to the numbess I have been experiencing with my $35 Pearl Izumi’s. It is the pearl Izumis that cost too much.

    Forgive poor Art, seemingly he hasn’t seen your Tab nor has he done the math ($669 glove total) appropriately addressing your glove fetish. That is what he paid for his Pista.

    Art has missed the general vibe of the blog, a mix of awe of legends, community among strangers, admiration of true wheelmen, a deep appreciation for the machine and those who build them and an affinity for suffering in style.

    I mean, has this guy seen the photos?!!

    On a more postive thread, I wore the lightweight jersey on Saturday. The construction alone is worth the price of admission. The fabric really performs.
    I show up for our Saturday mornig group ride and the guys go, “Ah, we’re thinking on riding to Roberts…”, I’m like, “ok, where’s that?” “oh, it’s beyond Bayfront, beyond Homestead… about 85 miles”. I laugh loudley. At 7:30am it is already 88 degrees and over 80% humidity with storm clouds everywhere. If you have been to Miami in the summer, you know the rain comes down so hard that automobile drivers will pull over to the side of the road until it passes. Meanwhile, we role.
    The Jersey kept me cool and warm (when wet). My own temperature control system. And when the ride was over, all of the brown road splooge came out with the wash.

    You get what you pay for….

    • Well said Kurt. The lightweight jersey is killer. Andy at Competitive Cyclist rates it as his single-most versatile piece of cycling kit. So many ways to wear it beyond “the hardest, hottest most demanding rides” which it does so well.

      Andy’s Video Review of the Rapha Spring Summer Jerseys (1:49 for the Lightweight portion)

      • Nathan says:

        I just checked out Andy’s video review. It is actually the Rapha club jersey which he mentions is the “.. single-most versatile piece of cycling kit.”

        Love the site by the way, and not just because I have a Rapha fetish and happen to own a Campy equipped Enigma.

        Nathan (in Germany)

        • You’re right Nathan he did sneak the word “club” in but the segment was about the LW jersey… confused me. I’ve asked Andy to clarify.

        • Nathan,

          You were right… clarification from Andy he was talking about a club jersey he’d been wearing since 2007
          ———————————————–

          Here’s the line from the script…in the segment in question I’m referring to the Croix De Fer Club jersey Simon sent me in 2007:

          I’ve had a quarter-zip Rapha Club Jersey for about two years now. I’ve worn it at least once a week and through all four seasons. It’s a perfect core insulating layer OVER a base layer but under a winter j ac ket. I also wear it over a base layer with arm warmers in the early spring, AND it’s one of the best super-hot weather jerseys in my drawer.
          In short, it’s THE single most versatile piece of cycling apparel I own. I tell everyone it’s simultaneously the warmest AND coolest short sleeve jersey I’ve ever used.

          AC

  15. Art says:

    Come on guys lighten up. I did compliment the photo’s, I suspect the photo’s that don’t make the cut here are better than anything I will ever take.

    I have been riding long enough to remember when all cycling gloves were leather. I also remember how nasty and stiff they got after a few rides. I admit I have zero fashion sense (most of my clothes come from Costco) but I know what works and what is worth spending more for. Besides if you can’t make fun of $150 gloves then what can you make fun of?

  16. BR says:

    Chrome shoes.

  17. Brandon says:

    Do the black Rapha criterium gloves stain your hands black? I have the Knog Love/Hate gloves in black and while I love the grip, appearance, and durability of leather, I hate having black thumbs and palms post ride. I’m sure it’s the dye used for the leather, but wasn’t sure if Rapha dyed theirs in the same manner.

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  19. willy in pacifica says:

    Hey Velo,

    Not sure if you still look at older posts but I used the Rapha Crit gloves on my 1,000k last week. I was worried they would be too warm but they worked just fine. However, after a couple of days I noticed that they were tattooing the heel of my hands. I think the black dye was being driven into my skin. It took 3 to 4 days for the black stain to go away and washing would not get rid of it.

    Maybe after a few more washes it might get better. I did not mind the stain and the gloves worked fine and after maybe 1,000 miles and a couple of washes they look almost as good as new.